Class 12| Alternative English (Prose)| Chapter-2| The testament of a walker

Class 12| Alternative English (Prose)| Chapter-2| The testament of a walker . Important questions for HS Second Year English Questions Answers brings you latest queries and solutions with accordance to the most recent pointers NCERT. Students will clear all their doubts with regard to every chapter by active these necessary chapter queries and elaborate explanations that area unit provided by our specialists so as to assist you higher. These queries can facilitate students prepare well for the exams thanks to time constraint. Class 12| Alternative English (Prose)| Chapter-2| The testament of a walker

Class 12| Alternative English (Prose)| Chapter-2| The testament of a walker

Chapter 2

ABOUT THE AUTHOR R. K. Narayan

R. K. Narayan (10 October 1906- 13 May 2001) was born in Madras. His father was a school headmaster. At an age of five years he was admitted to a missionary school and got opportunity to learn English. He received his higher Education at Maharajah’s College in Mysore. His first novel titled” Swami and Friends was published in 1935, which was followed by another novel. The Bachelor of Arts” in 1937. His other novels include- “The Dark Room (1938), The English Teacher (1949) and the Financial Expert (1952). He has written more than 12 novels, 5 collection of short stories. His most renowned collection of short stories is Malgudi days (1942). Narayan’s non fictional writings include a memoir titled my days (1974), two travelogues. My Dateless Diary (1960) and the Emerald Route (1980) and four collection of essays titled Next sunday (1960), Reluctant Guru (1974), A writer’s Nightmare (1988) and a story teller’s (1989). Narayan was also honoured with prestigious Sahitya Akademi Award for his famous novel. The Guide in 1958 in his novels and short stories Narayan has drawn a mesmerising world of Malgudi. The imaginative landscape of Malgudi dominated Narayan’s entire fictional world.

The easay “The Testament of a walker” has been excerpted from R.K Narayan’s volume A Writer’s Nightmare (1988)

SUMMARY:

In the essay “The Testament of a Walker” R. K. Narayan deals with his lack of “automobile sensibility” and pain of owing an automobile than about walking. The narrator of the story is impervious to the subtler values in a car. For him an automobile is only the means to an end. He is blind to all other points in car. Despite this defect, he came to own an inported car, flashy and full of sophistication. The car provided all facilities which caused ecstasy in every auto-pandits or experts. Moreover the narrator felt the uselessness of the most of the buttons and switches of his imported car. Unlike other people he found the car to be a burden since it restricted his mobility. Moreover it was also unnecessarily expensive. Somehow the narrator failed to understand the excitement and enthusiasm of the onlookers who held his car in high esteem. Since the narrator had no interest in automobiles he had faith to his conviction that a human being’s ultimate destiny lies in walking as he is endowed with pair of legs which can operate without petrol or gears. Eventually mankind will have to depend on walking as the only means of communication. After experiencing lots of bitterness while dealing with the mechanisms the narrator finally realised that he had no use for a car, having no office and outside engagements. The various mishaps that he encountered after owning the car, strengthened his belief. However the narrator also appreciated those especially one of his friend who spend his leisure under the car and replacing the damaged parts like a surgeon. The narrator’s friend also advised him not to give his car, up but the narrator was not inclined to accept his advice. So, the story ends on a humorous note with narrator’s reference to his friend’s eccentricities and oddities.

Very Short Answer Questions: 1 Mark

1. Who was R. K. Narayan? 

Ans: R.K. Narayan was an Indian writer, best known for his work set in the fictional South Indian town Malgudi.

2. What is the name of Narayan’s fictional town?

Ans: Malgudi.

3. What kind of characters people Narayan’s fiction? 

Ans :Narayan’s characters are the average the men and women of India.

4. What does an automobile mean to Narayan? 

Ans: For Narayan, an automobile is only the means to an end.

5. For how long during the ten years he uses the car, is the air- conditioner switched on? 

Ans: In the ten long years that Narayan used the car, he switched on the air conditioner for a total of only thirty minutes.

6. What is Narayan’s strong belief regarding ‘walking”? 

Ans: Narayan believed that man’s ultimate destiny lay in walking and that is the reason he is endowed with a pair of legs.

7. What is Narayan’s most ambitious work that he had been planning for years?

Ans: Narayan’s most ambitious work that he had been planning for years was to write a book entitled ‘The Testament of a Walker’. 

8. What constant dread does Narayan suffer from regarding the car and his driver?

Ans: Narayan used to suffer from the constant dread that his driver might feel inspired to test his car’s special virtue of attaining full speed in two minutes.

9. For how long does Narayan use his car? 

Ans: Narayan used his car for a total of ten years.

Short Answer Questions Type I: 2 Marks

1. What are the distinguishing features of Narayan’s fiction? 

Ans: The distinguishing feature of Narayan’s fiction is that it is underlined by ‘the mood of comedy, the sensitivity to atmosphere, the probing of physiological factors, and above all a detached observation’.

2. Why doesn’t Narayan’s driver particularly like to drive with the air-conditioner on?

Ans: Narayan’s driver did not like to drive with the air conditioner of because the closed windows prevented him from jutting out his hand to signal, which was a habit with him. Moreover it also meant he could not gesticulate at erring pedestrians and address them volubly in passing.

3. What does Narayan lack? Does he regret it?

Ans: According to R.K. Narayan, he lacked ‘automobile sensibility’, that is, a knowledge of or feeling for automobiles. No, Narayan did not regret this..

4. Why is Narayan indifferent to the mention of any petrol – ‘hike’? 

Ans: Narayan was indifferent to the mention of any petrol ‘hike’ because he believed that man’s destiny lay in walking and it was the reason God had endowed man with a pair of legs.

5. How does Narayan carry out his habit of ‘daily walking’ even in bad weather?

Ans: When forced to stay inside because of ‘bad weather’, Narayan would carry out his habit of ‘daily walking’ by pacing up and down his verandah.

6. Why is being noticed by virtue of his car a matter of big embarrassment to Narayan?

Ans: Narayan used to avoid all public engagements by citing false excuses of being out of town on the precise dates; but driving out in his fancy car led to him being noticed and this often caused him big embarrassment.

7. Why does Narayan have ‘to drive a hundred miles every time’ he requires any attention to his car? 

Ans: Narayan’s car was an imported one, too sophisticated to be handed over to regular mechanics. So Narayan had to drive a hundred miles to an accredited workshop every time his car required any attention.

8. What does Narayan begin to fear after every visit to the workshop? 

Ans: After his visits to the workshop, Narayan began to fear that he would go bankrupt if he had to continue to shell out exorbitant amounts of money every other week for his car.

9. What do you understand by the term ‘fanatic’ in the context of the lesson?

Ans: Fanatic in context of the text refers to a person filled with excessive enthusiasm.

Short Answer Questions Type 2: 3 Marks

1. How do people react to Narayan’s new imported car? 

Ans: Narayan’s flashy imported car caused a flutter wherever he went. It caused ecstasy in every auto-pundit who saw it. They could not stop and praising its many features. While some fawned over its- seats, others could not get over its multi-coloured speedometer and the sophisticated dashboard panel. Overall, much to R. K.Narayan’s dismay. his new car led to him being noticed by people everywhere. He could not lie his way out of public engagements with fake excuses about being out of town as his new car led to his movements being noticed every time he drove inside the town. Thus R. K. Narayan’s car piqued people’s interest and they reacted with genuine curiosity and admiration.

2. How deep rooted is Narayan’s philosophy of ‘walking”? 

Ans: Narayan’s philosophy of walking was deep rooted in his psyche. He believed that man had been bestowed with a pair of legs for the sole purpose of walking and in it lay his destiny. Narayan’s philosophy left him indifferent to news of petrol hikes because he believed that the steep rise in petrol prices would only lead to men rediscovering their ability to walk long distances.

3. What are the things that Narayan values most? How are they lost when he moves about in his gaudy car?

Ans: Narayan valued his privacy and anonymity the most. Both of these were lost when he moved about in his gaudy car because his car’s sophisticated nature and unique looks piqued people’s interest whenever he went and thus it always resulted in him being noticed by people. Thus Narayan compared his car to a howdah atop an elephant and rued that the passengers of both received the same amount of curious glances.

4. How is his car damaged?

Ans: Narayan’s car was damaged when two cyclists collided and fell on his car which was parked in front of the hospital. This accident resulted in the left parking light of the car being smashed.

5. What does the mechanic at the workshop do with the damaged part of the car?

Ans: The mechanic at the workshop asked Narayan to visit New York and buy the damaged part. When Narayan hinted that it was an absurd idea, the mechanic removed the light to fabricate a cover for it in plastic but he ended up stealing the entire thing. For the next time Narayan met him and enquired about his light, the mechanic lied blatantly and informed Narayan that he had already handed it over to him after due repairs. 

6. Why does Narayan call himself a ‘fanatic”?

Ans: Narayan referred to himself as ‘fanatic’ because of his obsession for taking daily walks. He mentioned that the philosophy of walking was deep rooted in him and to such an extent that he felt the need to pace in his verandah and make up on lost ‘walking time’ on the days when bad weather kept him indoors.

7. How does Narayan’s friend spend his leisure hours? 

Ans: Narayan’s friend spent his leisure hours tinkering under his car, for he trusted no mechanic or workshop to touch his imported car. He also spent a great amount of his time in collecting spare car parts from far and near. church.

Class 12 Alternative English Question Answer

PROSE

Chapter 1The Verger
Chapter 2The testament of a walker
Chapter 3The Scarecrow
Chapter 4The gift Of The Magi
Chapter 5On Not Being a Philosopher

POETRY

Chapter 1Sita
Chapter 2The Brook
Chapter 3Ozymandias Of Egypt
Chapter 4La Bella Dame Same Merci
Chapter 5Village Song

Long Answer Questions Type I: 4 Marks

1. What are the two conflicting opinions about the possession of the parking light of the car?

Ans: Narayan remembered his mechanic taking off his car’s damaged parking light to fabricate a cover for it in plastic. But when he enquired about it at their next meeting, the mechanic refused to accept that he had taken it, choosing instead to lie blatantly and shift the blame on Narayan. He asked Narayan to check his home to make sure that he had not forgotten his light there, for the mechanic claimed that he had given it back to Narayan after taking measurements. Thus while Narayan remembered the mechanic taking his light, the mechanic on his part insisted that Narayan was mistaken and he had done no such thing.

2. At the end, what makes Narayan give up on the idea of travelling by car? How does he plan to utilize his energies again? 

Ans: Being cheated of his car’s parking light by a mechanic at the workshop proved to be the final nail in the coffin for Narayan, who was already assailed by the high maintenance cost of his imported car and the loss of his privacy. And so he finally decided to give up on the idea of travelling by car.

Narayan planned to utilise his energies in writing stories.

3. How is Narayan’s friend different from him?

Ans: Narayan friend was into cars and automobiles and unlike Narayan he valued and prized his car. Narayan, on the other hand, thought of his ear more as a liability and a hitch in his daily routine of walking. He also felt that it had stripped him of his privacy and anonymity. Moreover whereas his friend loved to collect spare car parts and get under his car to tinker away at it on his leisure days, Narayan preferred to have his car checked by reputed mechanics for he was scared by its sophisticated nature. Thus Narayan and his friend were opposites when it came to cars.

4. What does Narayan’s friend enjoy doing most? 

Ans: Narayan’s friend enjoyed getting under his car on Sundays. He spent his leisure hours under his imported car, making adjustments and improvements. All his time was spent in collecting spare parts from far and near and Narayan believed he had enough parts piled up to assemble a new car.

5. What advice does his friend offer Narayan? Does this advice appeal to him?

Ans: Narayan’s friend advised him not to give up on his car. He suggested that Narayan should be on the lookout for a similar model and buy one at any price, for then he could transplant all the necessary parts into his own car. According to Narayan’s friend it was cheaper to buy a similar car and transfer parts than head to the workshops for every trivial problem. He further suggested that Narayan could sell the shell of the used up car to any fellow who was planning to set up a wayside tea stall or even covert it into a little garden in his own compound.

6. Why is the acquisition of a sophisticated, imported car ‘an irrelevancy and a nuisance’ for Narayan? 

Ans: Acquisition of a sophisticate, imported car was ‘an irrelevancy and a nuisance’ for Narayan because apart from its high maintenance cost and the necessity of driving a hundred miles for every simple repair job, driving around in it meant the end of his privacy and anonymity. Much to R. K.Narayan’s dismay, his new car led to him being noticed by people everywhere. He could not lie his way out of public engagements with fake excuses about being out of town, as his new car led to his movements being noticed every time he drove inside the town. Thus his car piqued people’s interest and they reacted with genuine curiosity and admiration. Moreover being in possession of a car also hampered his habit of taking long, daily walks. Thus, Narayan ended up feeling that buying an imported car was not the best decision he had made.

Long Answer Questions Type 2: 5 Marks

Explain with reference to the context :

1. ….. In a similar category, I am impervious to the subtler values in a car. To me an automobile is only the means to an end; I am satisfied if I am provided a seat and four wheels that can roll and I am blind to all other points in a car. 

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece “The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana.

The author mentions in the text that there are people in this world who have no ear for music or cannot appreciate the subtleties of art or even distinguish between colour schemes. He then goes on to say that he faces a similar predicament for he is impervious to the finer features of a car that set it apart from the others of its kind. Explaining his disability, the author points out that he is only too happy to be provided with a seat and a set of four wheels. The automobile for him is only the means to an end and he continues to be blind to the subtler features of a car that make it appear snazzy or sophisticated to others.

2. Now he felt constricted, encapsulated, and tongue-tied, and drove Also, I think, he was conditioned to driving to the tune of a rattle and roar of other vehicles beside, behind, and ahead, and without such accompaniments he could not proceed with any confidence.

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece “The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana and describe the condition of his driver when forced to drive with the air conditioner on.

Narayan’s driver loathed driving with the air conditioner on because the closed windows prevented him from jutting out his hand to signal, which was a habit with him. Moreover it also meant he could not gesticulate at erring pedestrians and address them volubly in passing. Thus he ended up feeling caged and constricted inside the car. Moreover he was used to driving in sync with the rattle and roar of the other vehicles and deprived of those sounds by the air conditioner, his confidence faltered while at the wheel.

3. I lack automobile sensibility and do not regret it, I have a strong belief that man’s ultimate destiny lies in walking, that is why he is endowed with a pair of legs, which can operate without petrol or gears. It is this philosophy that leaves me indifferent at the mention of any petrol ‘hike’.

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana and describe his philosophy on walking.

In the satirical prose piece, Narayan confides in his readers that he lacked “automobile sensibility or knowledge of or feeling for automobiles. But this was not something Narayan regretted because he was a staunch believer of the philosophy that man’s destiny lay in walking. This in turn left him indifferent to any news of hike in petrol prices because he rejoiced to think that the ‘hikes’ might one day lead man to discover the lost art of ‘walking and he will realize the true worth of his pair of legs.

4. Among the things I value are privacy and anonymity; both are lost when I allow myself to be carried about in a gaudy car. It is like sitting in a howdah on an elephant back and hoping not to be noticed.

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece “The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana.

Narayan valued his privacy and anonymity the most. Both of these were lost when he moved about in his gaudy car because his car’s sophisticated nature and unique looks piqued people’s interest whenever he went and thus it always resulted in him being noticed by people. Thus Narayan compared his car to a howdah atop an elephant and rued that neither could escape the curious glances and questioning looks of passers-by.

5. I began to fear that at this rate (I was obliged to visit the workshop every other week to shed my savings), I should soon reach the brink of bankruptcy effortlessly. I seemed to have let myself into a strange world peopled by a class of high priests and voodoomen, the workings of whose minds I could never fathom, but still, who held sway over me. 

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece. The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana. 

Narayan’s car was an imported one, too sophisticated to be handed over to regular mechanics. So Narayan had to drive a hundred miles to an accredited workshop every time his car required any attention. But after some back to back visits to the workshop, Narayan began to fear that he would go bankrupt if he had to continue to shell out exorbitant amounts of money every other week for his car. This in turn led him to think that by buying the sophisticated car, he had allowed himself to be enchanted and carried away into the world of high class people whose minds and thoughts he could never unravel.

6. The settled it, I was appalled at the thought of all the travail I had undergone and the expense, and considering that actually I had no use for a car, having no office or outside engagements, using it only to catch it at the end of a long walk… it seemed to me the most thoughtless thing I had done in my life to have acquired this car. I decided to get rid of it, lock it up in the shed as soon as possible to turn my energies again to writing stories.

Ans: The given lines have been extracted from the satirical prose piece ‘The Testament of a Walker’ written by R.K. Narayana and describes the situation which finally makes him give up on the idea of travelling by car.

Narayan referred to his car as an ‘irrelevancy and a nuisance’ that he had brought into his life and decided he had no real use for it. But he still continued using it until he was cheated of his car’s parking light by a mechanic at the workshop. This proved to be the final nail in the coffin for Narayan, who was already assailed by the high maintenance cost of his imported car and the loss of his privacy and so he decided to give up on the idea of travelling by car. And instead of spending energy worrying about the car, Narayan decided to refocus his energies on writing stories, instead.

Leave a Reply