Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-3| Ozymandias Of Egypt

Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-3| Ozymandias Of Egypt Important questions for HS Second Year English Questions Answers brings you latest queries and solutions with accordance to the most recent pointers NCERT. Students will clear all their doubts with regard to every chapter by active these necessary chapter queries and elaborate explanations that area unit provided by our specialists so as to assist you higher. These queries can facilitate students prepare well for the exams thanks to time constraint. Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-3| Ozymandias Of Egypt

Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-3| Ozymandias Of Egypt

Chapter 3

ABOUT THE AUTHOR : Percy Bysshe Shelley

P.B. Shelley (4 August 1792-8 July 1822) was born in Sussex, England in the year 1792. He was a follower of the ideals of Romantic Revivalism introduced by William wordsworth and S.T. Coleridge. He was known for his radical political and social views and these views are reflected in his work. In his college life he was expelled for publishing “The Necessity of Atheism” a pamphlet written on the subject matter of personal and political freedom. He was a great poet known for his revolutionary ideals. his opinions on the monarchy and authoritarian rule in England is expressed in his “Mask of Anarchy” (1819). His desire for social change is expressed in his work “Queen Mab” (1813), “Th Revolt of Islam (1818) Shelley was a good and successful lyricist. He has composed some of the finest lyrics like ode to the West Wind, To a skylark, ‘Ozymandias’, ‘The Cloud’ ‘when soft voices Die,” “The cloud,” “Adonais,” etc. His major works also include ‘The Cenci’, ‘Promethus Unbound,’ ‘Epipsychidion,’ etc. Shelley belonged to a group of visionary poets, writers and thinkers that included among others, his wife Mary Shelley, Leigh Hunt, Thomas Love Peacock and Lord Byron. He was having a zeal for reformation which was not shared by the Romantic poets of his age. His lyricism and his revolutionary ideals are the basis of his popularity.

SUMMARY

In the Poem “Ozymandias of Egypt,” the narrator met a traveller coming from an antique land. He told the narrator about the broken statue of Ozymandias, a powerful king of Egypt, lying in the sands of al vast desert. He came across two vast and trunk les legs of stone standing in the desert. The shattered head and broken face of the statue was partly buried in the sand. The huge size of the legs were indicative of the colossol size and appearance of the statue. The half visible face of the statue was indicative of Ozymandias pride and anger. The fear had a frown and mask of sneer suggestive of Ozymandias power over his subjects. The narrator than appreciated the sculptor’s ability in reproducing the vain nature of the ruler. The sculptor very well knew the passions of the king and engraved them on the face of the statue. On the pedestal of the statue were inscribed the words “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings,/Look on my works, Yemighty, and despair!” However only the ruins of the statue remained. The proud king, Ozymandias had died long ago and his kingdom was turned into desert but the mark of vavity and pride were there on the lifeless stone. The king died but the mark of the artist’s hands were still surviving on the broken parts of the statue. Sculptor’s hand here seemed to mock the pride and vavity of the king. Here shelley wants to reveal the idea that art is more permanent and long lasting than material properity and human’s life. Here the poet has used Ozymandias as a metaphor to comment upon the impermanence of political power and transitory aspect of human life.

Very short Answer Questions: 1 marks

1. Who is the poet of the poem, ‘Ozymandias of Egypt”? 

Ans: P.B. Shelley is the poet of the poem ‘Ozymandias of Egypt.

2. Who did the narrator meet?

Ans: The narrator met a traveller from an antique land i.e. Egypt.

3. Where did the traveller come from?

Ans: The traveller came from an antique land i.e. Egypt.

4. What is the antique land referred to here in the poem? 

Ans: The antique land referred to here in the poem is Egypt.

5. What is a sonnet?

Ans: A sonnet is a fourteen line lyric poem, using any of a number of formal rhyming scheme.

6. Give the meaning of the following words : Antique, visage, pedestal, colossal, wreck, stamped.

Ans

  • Antique : Something very old; an ancient civilization.
  • Visage : face
  • Pedestal : supporting structure of piece; base.
  • Colossal wreck: a heap of the fragmented pieces of the statue.
  • Stamped : The frown and the sneer have been successfully impinted on the face..

Short Answer Questions Type -1: 2 marks

1. Who recounts the tale of Ozymandias and his broken statue lying in the desert to the narrator of the poem. 

Ans: A traveler from an antique land recounts the tale of ozymandias and his broken statue lying in the desert to the narrator of the poem.

2. Who was Ozymandias?

Ans: Ozymandias was the name by which Ramses II, a pharaoh, famous. for many architectural was known to the Greeks. He was also known for his pride and vanity.

3. Whose hand ‘mocked them??

Ans: The arrogance and vanity of the king ozymandias was mocked by the hand of the sculptor who carved the statue of the king.

4. What is meant by the ‘colossal wreck’? 

Ans: The term ‘colossal wreck’ means a heap of the fragmented pieces of the statue. In the poem it refers to the fragmented pieces of the statue of king Ozymandias.

Short Answer Questions Type -2: 3 marks

1. Describe the condition of the statue in the desert. 

Ans: The traveller came a fragmented statue in the vast desert. He saw two trunkless legs of stone standing in the desert. The huge size of the legs indicated the colossal size and appearance of the statue. The broken face of the statue was lying half sunk in the sand near the statue. The half visible face bore an expression of king’s pride, arrogance and vavity. The frown and wrinkled lips were visible on the broken face of the statue, which revealed that the sculptor very well knew the passions of the king and he engraved them on the face of the statue. On the Pedestal of the statue were inscribed the words. “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings, Look on my works ye mighty and despair.”

2. What are the expressions of the king as stamped on the statue?

Ans: The expressions Frown and Wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command were stamped on the statue of the king ozymandias while the half visible face of the statue bore an expression of king’s pride, arrogance and vanity. The expressions on the statue suggests that ozymandias must have yielded a lot of power over his subject.

3. What do the expressions on the face of the statue suggest about the king?

Ans: The expressions on the face of the statue suggests that ozymandias must have yielded a lot of power over its subjects. The expressions suggests pride, arrogance and vanity of the king ozymandias. Moreover it also suggests the efficiency of the sculptor who had carved and mocked the arrogance and pride of king ozymandias.

4. The heart that fed’ …… Explain.

Ans: The line “The heart that fed’ has been taken from P.B. Shelley’s poem “Ozymandias of Egypt”. It refers to the feelings that ruled the heart of the king Ozymandias fed the sculptor’s creativity. It indicates the ability of the sculptor who skillfully reproduced the pride, vanity and arrogance of the ruler.

5. What are the words that were inscribed on the pedestal?

Ans : The words inscribed on the pedestal of the statue of king Ozymandias were: My name is Ozymandias, king of Kings, Look on my works, Ye mighty and despair!”

6. What else remains besides the ruins of the statue? 

Ans: Besides the broken statue in the vast desert there remained the impression of the artistic hands of the sculptor who had carned the statue of king Ozymandias and mocked at the arrogance and vavity of the king. It the power of art infront of material world. Art is more permanent and everlasting than human life which is futile in the scheme of The mark of the artist’s greatness lied on the broken parts of the statue. It signifies that art is more superior to material prosperity as it can face the onslaught of time.

7. What idea is carried forth in the lines ‘boundless and bare, the lone and level sands stretch far away’?

Ans: The lines “boundless and bare, the lone and level sands stretch far away indicated that the fragmented statue of king Ozymandias was lying in the sands of a vast desert only the ruins of the statue remained, speaking of the greatness of the sculptor’s hand. Around the statue nothing but the vast desert was stretched. It stretched in stark contrast to the vain glorious effect of the king to perpetuate his memory and thereby proclaimed the transitory aspect of human life. The idea reflected here is that, neither the king nor his empire remained what remained were the ruins of the statue lying in the vast desert.

Class 12 Alternative English Question Answer

PROSE

Chapter 1The Verger
Chapter 2The testament of a walker
Chapter 3The Scarecrow
Chapter 4The gift Of The Magi
Chapter 5On Not Being a Philosopher

POETRY

Chapter 1Sita
Chapter 2The Brook
Chapter 3Ozymandias Of Egypt
Chapter 4La Bella Dame Same Merci
Chapter 5Village Song

Long Answer Questions Type-1: 4 marks

1. How skilled is the sculptor in his art? 

Ans: The sculptor is very much efficient in his art. He had skillfully reproduced the vain nature of the king Ozymandias. The sculptor very well knew the passions of the king and engraved them on the face of the statue. The king had died but the mark of the artist’s hand were still surviving on the broken parts of the statue. The feelings that ruled the heart of the king feel the sculptor’s creativity. The sculptor was efficient to bring out passions ruling the heart of Ozymandias.

2. What do the words on the pedestal of the statue imply? 

Ans : The words on the pedestal of the statue implies the pride, arrogance and vanity of king Ozymandias. He asked the ‘Mighty” to look on his work and despair, because of his pride and arrogance. He never realized that material prosperity, pomp and glory are subject to decay and destruction. Nothing is permanent in this world. Only the ruins of the statue remained. Neither the king nor his empire survived the onslaught of time. The inscription on the statue merely implies man’s hollow pride and futility.

3. Does Shelley glorify the greatness of the king? 

Ans: No, Shelley does not glorify the greatness of the king. Infact the poet has glorified art which is more permanent than material prosperity. The proud king Ozymandias had died and his kingdom turned into the desert but the humble artist’s hand survived as a mark on the broken parts of the statue. The broken statue of king Ozymandias symbolise the permanence of art and transitory nature of human life.

Long Answer Question Type – 2:5 marks:

1. What is the central idea of the poem, ‘Ozymandias of Egypt’? 

Ans: The Central idea of Shelley’s sonnet ‘Ozymandias of Egypt is man’s vavity and its vagueness in the face of art. Art is more permanent than material power. To immortalise his name king Ozymandias got a statue of his built. It was a huge statue. The king was pound and arrogant. But his pride and arrogance ended in decay and destruction as the ruins of his statue remained only in the vast desert and nothing else. But the mark of the scultor who skillfully reproduced the vain nature of ruler survived the onslaught of time. The hand of the sculptor seemed to mock the pride and vavity of the king. Shelley through this poem uphold the idea of human mortality and the permanence of art.

2. Explain with reference to the context:

(a) Half sunk, a shatter’ d visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamp’d on these lifeless things, 

The hand that mock’d them and the heart that fed.

Ans: “Half sunk……………. Heart that fed.”

These lines have been quoted from P.B. Shelley’s poem “Ozymandias of Egypt”. In the poem, the poet deals with the idea of human mortality and the permanence of art.

In the present context the poet referred about the broken statue of king Ozymandias and efficiency of the sculptor who had carved the statue. The narrator met a traveller from an antique land, who came across the fragmented statue of king Ozymandias. The traveller came across two trunkless legs of stone standing in the desert. The huge size of the legs were indicative of the colossal size and appearance of the king. The broken face of the statue was lying half sunk in the sand. And the half visible face bare on expression of the king’s pride and arrogance. It seemed as if the sculptor who had carved the statue very well knew the passions of the king. The proud and boastful expressions were there on the visible face of the broken statue the sculptor had efficiently carved the statue and mocked at the arrogance and vanity of the king. The power and pelf of the king were destroyed with the passage of time but the mark of the sculptor’s hand survived the onslaught of time.

(b) My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye mighty,and despair!. Nothing beside remains: round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Ans: My name …….. Far away.

These lines have been extracted from P.B. Shelley’s poem “Ozymandias of Egypt”. In the poem the poet has dealt with the idea of human mortality and the permanence of art.

In the present context the poet has shown pride and arrogance of king Ozymandias. It also reflects the idea that man’s power and glory are subject to decay.

Ozymandias, the mighty king of Egypt commissioned a sculptor to create his enormous statue to show his power and to immortalize his name. He though that he had done something which others could not do in their life so he asked the “Mighty” to look on his work and despair. He never realized that material prosperity, pomp and glory are subject to decay. With the passage of time the king had died and the broken parts of the statue remained, lying in the vast desert. Around the broken statue of the king Ozymandias, nothing but the sands of the vast desert were visible, spreading to limitless horizon. It stretched in stark contrast to the vain glorious effects of the king to perpetuate his memory and thereby proclaim the transitory aspect of human life. The decaying ancient statue reflects on the idea that the pursuit of power and glory for own sake are fleeting and illusory. Human glory and pomp are never lasting as they are time bound and mortal.

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