Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-2| The Brook

Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-2| The Brook. Important questions for HS Second Year English Questions Answers brings you latest queries and solutions with accordance to the most recent pointers NCERT. Students will clear all their doubts with regard to every chapter by active these necessary chapter queries and elaborate explanations that area unit provided by our specialists so as to assist you higher. These queries can facilitate students prepare well for the exams thanks to time constraint. Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-2| The Brook

Class 12| Alternative English (Poetry)| Chapter-2| The Brook

Chapter 2

ABOUT THE POET :Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson (6 August 1809 6 October 1892) was a Victorian poet. Tennyson was born in Lincolnshire, England. He was the son of a Clergyman. He started writing from a very early age. His collection of poems entitled “The Lady of Shallot,” “The Lotus-Eaters,” “The Palace of Art”, were published in 1832. After his friend Arthur Hallam’s death he published a volume of poems entitled “Ulyssey’s”, “Morte D’Arthur” and the lyric “Break, Break, Break”. His most popular work is an elegy written in the memory of his friend Arthur, entitled “In Memoriam”. It was published in 1850. His other famous poems include “The charge of the Light Brigade” (1854), “Mund and other poems” (1855) and “Idylls of the king” (1859). In November 1850, he was appointed poet Laureate. Tennyson died at the age of 83. He was buried in the poet’s corner at Westminster Abbey.

SUMMARY

In the poem “The Brook” Tennyson, a keen observer of nature personifies a rocky stream when he describes its criss cross journey. The stream describes itself as a human being that observes the myriad manifestations of nature along its path. The stream originates from a place which is a habitat of aquatic birds like Coot and the Heron. It emerges suddenly and rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. There it makes a lot of commotion and noise. It flows down thirty hills, slips between the ridges and passes through twenty villages and a small town, farms and fields in the brimming sunlight, and at night shattering, gurgling and bubbling as it flows downward in a curving movement. It finally joins the brimming river. The brook has its own life support system. Many herbs, bushes, plants, willows, lawns, flowers grow near its banks. It also carries lusty trouts and gaylings providing food for animals and men. In the refrain, the poet brings out the contrast between the transient life of man and the eternal onward flow of the brook. Human beings take birth and die but the brook is a never ending process, in no way it is affected by the worlding activities.

Very Short Answer Questions: (1 Marks)

1. Who is the ‘I’ in the poem, ‘The Brook”? 

Ans : In the poem “The Brook”, a rocky stream i.e a Brook is the ‘T’.

2. Who does the brook rush down to join?

Ans: The brook rush down to join the brimming river in the valley.

3. What flower grows by the brook for ‘happy lovers’? 

Ans: The flower which grows by the brook for happy lovers is forget me not’s.

4. Give the meaning of the following words: Haunts, sally, bicker, thorps, eddying, field and fallow, foreland, skimming, cresses.

Ans

  • haunts: a place frequently visited.
  • Sally: a sudden movement
  • Bicker: Quarrel, a reference to the rushing sound of water.
  • Thorps: small hamlets (villages)
  • Eddying: a circular movement of water causing a small whirlpool.
  • Field and fallow: ploughed land but left uncultivated. 
  • Foreland: A piece of land in front of a particular feature.
  • Skimming:move quickly through a surface are air 
  • Cresses: Watercress a plant that grows in running water.

Short Answer Questions Type 1 (Marks-2)

1. Where does the brook originate from? 

Ans: The brook originated from the highest hill ranges which are the dwelling places of birds like the coot and the heron.

2. What is a brook?

Ans : A Brook is a small, natural stream of fresh water, which originates from the highest hill ranges. 

Short Answer Questions Type 2 (Marks – 3)

1. What are coots and herons? Where do you find them? 

Ans: Coots and herons are aquatic birds. We find them on the highest hill ranges.

2. What is the eternal truth stressed upon in the poem? 

Ans: In the poem the poet stressed upon the eternal truth that human life is transitory. Before the cycle of death man is helpless. Despite their best efforts man cannot escape the clutches of death but the nature has the ability to defy the ravages of time.

3. What is the brook representative of?

Ans: The brook is the representative of the timeless with its ability to defy the ravages of time..

Long Answer Questions Type-1: Marks 5

1. The poet effectively traces the journey of the brook through a series of onomatopoeic sound images. Mention some of them, 

Ans: Alfred lord Tennyson in the poem ‘The Brook’ traces the journey of the brook through onomatopoeic sound images.

Some of them are:

  1. Bicker: Bicker describes the noisy flow of the brook when rushes down from the remote hills. 
  2. Chatter: The Brook chatters over stony ways, making constant high pitched sound. It refers to constant, nonstop and friendly noises of the brook. 
  3. Murmur: When the brook flows through the bushy wilderness it creates a soft and low sound under the moon and stars at night.

2. What is the refrain in the poem, ‘The Brook’? Bring out thevprofundity in it. 

Ans: The refrain in the poem is :

“For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.” In the poem “The Brook” the refrain brings about an effective contrast between the transient life of man and the eternal onward flow of the brook, a representative of nature. The refrain highlights the single the idea and maintains the unity of the poem. In the poem, throughout it maintains the idea that human life is transitory and the brook is a never ending process. The refrain has also heightened the poetic and musical effect of the poem.

Long Answer Questions Type 2 (Marks – 5)

1. Comment on the beauty of nature as described in ‘The Brook’.

Ans : Lord Tennyson was a keen observer of nature. In the poem “The Brook” he idealised nature and gave it human attributes. In the poem the poet personifies a rocky stream as it rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. The poet has depicted nature at its utmost beauty when he says that the stream originates from a place, fragmented by aquatic birds like coot and heron. It makes a sudden sally and comes down noisily to the valley. It sparkles on shines through the flowerless plants or ferns in the sunlight. It continues it journey in curves and moving forward. It flows in a zigzag way finding its own way sometimes shrinking and sometimes expanding. It continues its journey amid flaura and fauna of the country side. It gets flower as its companion sailing over the surface of the brook. The brook, an epitome of natural beauty also reflects upon the elemal aspect of life.. There is an end to every form of life but nature and its beautiful panorama is everlasting. In the poem “The brook” Tennyson has idealised nature with all its beauty and gracefulness.

Class 12 Alternative English Question Answer

PROSE

Chapter 1The Verger
Chapter 2The testament of a walker
Chapter 3The Scarecrow
Chapter 4The gift Of The Magi
Chapter 5On Not Being a Philosopher

POETRY

Chapter 1Sita
Chapter 2The Brook
Chapter 3Ozymandias Of Egypt
Chapter 4La Bella Dame Same Merci
Chapter 5Village Song

2. Trace the eventful journey of the brook. 

Ans: The Journey of the brook begins in the highest hill ranges which are the dwelling places of the acquatic birds like coot and heron. It rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. In its infancy it makes a sudden sally with lot of commotion and noise. The brook hurries down thirty hills and slips between the ridges. It passes through twenty villages, small town, farms and fields in the brimming sunlight. At night shattering, gurgling and bubbling it flows downward in a curve movement. The brook flows on in a zigzag way finding its own course, sometimes shrinking and sometimes expanding. Its movement is not uniform. As it continues its Journey amid the flora and fauna of the country side it gets a flower as its companion which sails over the surface of the brook. In its journey it also offers sanctuary to small fishes like the Trent and gaylings. In the course of journey the brook seems to be talking constantly in a friend way to the things that obstruct its flow. And after chattering it prepares itself to join the brimming river in the valley below.

3. Explain with reference to the context: 

(a) I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,Among my skimming swallows;

I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows

Ans: “I slip, I slide.. …….. Sandy shallows

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Brook” by Alfred Lord Tennyson. 

In the present context, Tennyson a keen observer of nature personifies a rocky stream when he describes its criss cross journey. The brook rushes down from the remote hills to join the over flowing river in the valley below. The brook moves along making different movements in the course of its journey. It slips, slides and moves through darkness. The swallow birds skim on the surface of water for food. In the course of journey, waves of the brook create a net like structure on which the sun shine sparkle. It seems as if the sun beams are dancing on its surface.

(b) I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses,I linger by my shingly bars; I loiter round my cresses.

Ans: “I murmur under …… ……… cresses”. The aboves lines have been quoted from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s poem “The Brook”. Here the poet personifies a rocky stream when he describes its criss cross journey.

In the present context the poet has dealt with the leisurely movement of the brook.

The brook emerges suddenly and rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. During night under the moon and the stars the brook continues its journey, It create sound through the natural land where thorny bushes grow. The brook often lingers due to stones on the way. It moves purposelessly, around the plant named cresses. The brook flows through the bushy wilderness, creating a soft and low sound. It becomes relaxed like an old man, and finally it joins the brimming river.

(c) And out again I curve and flow 

To join the brimming river,For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever.

Ans: “And out again……………… for forever”

These lines have been quoted from Lord Tennyson’s poem “The Brook”. In the poem the poet personifies a rocky stream while describing its criss – cross journey.

In the present context the poet has revealed that human life is transitory while the nature is eternal. 

The brook rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. It continues its journey in curves, and moves forward and finally it joins the brimming river. In its journey from the hills to brimming river, the stream gloats over its ability to defy the ravages of time. It throws light on the timeless existence of the stream and men’s helplessness against the cycle of birth and death. It is indestructible unlike the boastful human who despite their best efforts cannot escape the jaws of death. Brook a representative on nature is ever lasting while human life is transitory.

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