Class 12 English Chapter-2 Lost Spring

Class 12 English Chapter-2 Lost Spring. Important questions for HS First Year English Questions Answers brings you latest queries and solutions with accordance to the most recent pointers NCERT. Students will clear all their doubts with regard to every chapter by active these necessary chapter queries and elaborate explanations that area unit provided by our specialists so as to assist you higher. These queries can facilitate students prepare well for the exams thanks to time constraint. Class 12 English Chapter-2 Lost Spring

HS second year English Chapter-2 Lost Spring

Very Short Questions & Answers (Marks:

Q.1. Who is the author of ‘Lost Spring’? 

Ans : Anees Jung is the author of ‘Lost Spring.’

Q.2. What is ‘Lost Spring’ about? 

Ans : ‘Lost Spring’ is about the poor boy named Saheb

Q.3. What is the original book from which this prose piece is an excerpt?

Ans: The original book from which this prose piece an excerpt is ‘stories of stolen childhood.’

Q.4. Who is Saheb? 

Ans : Saheb is a poor ragpicker.

Q.5. Whom does the author encounter everyday in the street?

Ans : The author encounters Sahe› everyday in the street. 

Q.6. What does this person do everyday?

Ans : Everyday Saheb scrounging for gold in the garbage dumps of her neighbourhood.

Q.7. Where is the original home of this person? 

Ans : The original home of this person is Dhaka in Bangladesh.

Q.8. Why have saheb and his family migrated to Seemapuri?

Ans : Saheb and his family have migrated to Seemapuri for natural calamities.

Q.9. What does Saheb look for in the garbage dumps? 

Ans : Saheb looks for a ‘gold’ in the garbage dumps. 

Q.10. What is Saheb’s full name?

Ans : Saheb’s full name is Saheb-e-Alam.

Q.11. What is meaning of Saheb’s full name? 

Ans : The meaning of Saheb’s full name is ‘lord of the universe’.

Q.12. Whom does Saheb observe standing at the fenced gate of the neighbourhood club?

Ans : Shaeb stands at the fenced gate of the neighbourhood club and observes two young men, dressed in white clothes, playing tennis.

Q.13. What is Saheb wearing?

Ans : Saheb is wearing tennis shoes that look strange over his discoloured shirt and shorts.

Q.14. Where is seemapuri?

Ans : Seemapuri is the settlement of ragpickers at the outskirts of Delhi.

Q.15. Who is Mekesh?

Ans : Mukesh belongs to a poor family of bangle makers in Ferozabad, but he disliked to work in the glass-blowing industry.

Q.16. Where does he stay?

Ans : He stays in Ferozabad. 

Q.17. What is his dream? 

Ans : Mukesh dream is to be a motor-mechanic.

Q.18. Why is Mukesh proud to take the author to his home?

Ans : Mukesh proud to take the author to his home to to a garage and learnt the required training.

Q.19. Who is Savita?

Ans : Savita is a young girl.

Q.20. Who is in charge of Mukesh household? 

Ans : Bahu, the daughter-in-law of the house in charge of Mukesh household.

Short Questions & Answers (Marks : 2)

Q.1. What is saheb explanation as to why he scrounging for gold in the heaps of garbage dumps?

Ans : Saheb is a poor ragpicker of Seemapuri. Like other 10,000 ragpickers he also looks for gold in the heaps of garbage dumps. He roams the street mith his friends scanning the garbage heaps. Somimes he finds even a ten rupee note. If lucky he can find silver coin in a heap of garbage. Garbage is wrapped in wonder for ragpickers like Saheb.

Q.2. What is the author’s reply to saheb’s explanation?

Ans : After months of knowing the narrator, Aness fung asked saheb’s name. Saheb simply reply that he is called Sahebe-Alam. It means ‘Lord of the universe.’ But this saheb-eAlan in a bare foot boy, who scrounding for gold’ in a heap of garbage dumps.

Q.3. Why does the advice sound hollow?

Ans : The narrator asked Saheb to go to school. Saheb replied that there was no school in the neighbourhood. The narrator asked half-jocking if he would go when she started English 2nd a school. When Saheb kept on asking her, “Is your school ready. Then the advice sound hollow.

Q.4. Why is the author embarrssed?

Ans : The narrator asked Saheb to go to a school. Saheb. replied that there is no school in the neighbourhood. The narrator asked half jocking if he would go when she starts a school. Saheb kept on asking her. “Is your school ready.” Then she felt embarrassed.

Q.5. What is irony inherent in Saheb’s full name?

Ans : After months of knowing the narrator asks Saheb’s name. He tells her that he is called Saheb-e-Alam. It means. ‘Lord of the universe.’ It is quite ironical that this Saheb-eAlam is a young barefoot ragpicker. He scrounges for gold in the heaps of garbage dumps of Delhi.

Q.6. Why is not Saheb wearing ‘chappals’?

Ans : The narrator Anees Jung asks why he doesnot wear ‘chappals’. He simply answers that his mother died not buy them. Some say it is not lack of the money. There is a tradition to stay bare foot and siums. This explanation doesnot hold good. It seems merely an excuse to explain away a perpetual states of proverty.

Q.7. What is the explanation of author boy to saheb’s answer?

Ans : Saheb told the author he was not wearing chappals because his mother didnot get them down from the shelf. At this, another child, who was listening to their conversation explained that even if his mother had got them, he would have thrown them off.

Q.8. Why are most such children barefoot?

Ans : The narrator, Anees Jung asks saheb why he doesnot weare ‘chappals’ or barefoot. He simply answers that his mother didnot buy them. Some say it is not lack of money. There is a tradition to stay bare-foot and slums. This explanation does not hold good. It seems merely an excuse to ‘explain away a perpetual states of proverty.”

Q.9. What is the probable reason behind such an explanation?

Ans : Some say that the ragpickers stay barefoot not due to lack of money but due to tradition to not wear chappals and stay barefoot. However, such an explanation might be just an excuse to explain away a perpetual state of poverty.

Q.10. Where does Saheb work now?

Ans : Now, Saheb was working in a tea-stall down the road. He was paid Rs. 800/- and all his meals. But Saheb doesnot seem to be happy working in the tea-stall.

Q.11. How much is Saheb paid in his new job? 

Ans : Saheb is paid 800 (eight hundred) Rupees and all his meals.

Q.12. How does shaeb get the shoes he is wearing? 

Ans : Saheb gets the shoes of a rich tennis player. The rich boy afford to wear the shoes because of a hole is one side of the shoes. In this way Saheb gets the shoes, he in wearing.

Q.13. Does Saheb like the job? Why or why not?

Ans : No, Saheb does not like the job, because the steel canister he holds now in very heavy. The plastic bag he used to carry on his shoulder earlier was very light. The bag was his own. The canister belongs to the master. Saheb is no longer his own master.

Q.14. What did the man from Udipi pray for at the temple as a young boy?

Ans : The man from Udipi, when he was a child, would go to school passing by an old temple, where his father was  a priest. He would always stop briefly at the temple and pray for a pair of shoes.

Q.15. What is the change seen now in the temple and the town of Udipi?

Ans : A man from Udipi told the writer that as a school pray for a pair of shoes at the temple, where boy he would his father was a priest. Thirty years later when Anees Jung visited the town, she saw the temple drowned in desolation. In the backyard, where the new preist lived, there were red and white plastic chairs. She noticed a boy in a grey uniform, wearing socks and shoes and carrying a school bag had just arrived. Thus, it showed that the economic condition of the present priest of that temple has become much better than that of the priest who served there thirty years ago.

Q.16. Who are the inmates of Seemapuri?

Ans : The ragpickers like Saheb who were migrated to Seemapuri from Bangladesh are the inmates of Seemapuri. 

Q.17. Why don’t children like Saheb ever giveup hope? 

Ans: Now, Saheb gets a new job. He is working in a teastall now. He is paid Rs. 800/- and all his meals. As Saheb give up scrounging for ‘gold’ in heap of garbage dumps. So, children don’t like Saheb.

Q.18. How does one servive in Seemapuri?

Ans : Seemapuri a place on the outskirts of Delhi, is a settlement of ragpickers. Over 10,000/- people mostly migrated from Bangladesh in 1971, are ingaged in this job. Children scrounge for gold in a heap of garbage dumps. Garbage for children in wrapped in wonder. For elders it is a means of servival. And servival in Seemapuri means ragpicking.

Q.19. What are the two different worlds in Firozabad ? 

Ans: The narrator finds two distinct worlds in Firozabad The first one is of the families of the bangle-makers caught in a perpetual web of poverty. The other is the vicious circle of the ‘Sahukars’ the middlemen, the policemen and the politicians who ensure the perpetual exploitation of these bangle makers.

Q.20. Why is Mukesh’s dream a mirage?

Ans : Mukesh’s dream a mirage because he didnot like the job. He hates in working in such a glass-blowing industry. He wanted to be a motor mechanic. So, he went to a garage to take the training for learnt the profession.

Q.21. What is the significance of bangle in an Indian Society?

Ans : In an Indian society, the bangle is a symbolic of a married Indian women’s ‘suhaag’ auspiciousness in marriage. An Indian bride invariably wears red bangles in their wrists.

Q.22. Why does not Mukesh ever dream of flying a plane?

Ans : Mukesh belongs a boy of a poor family. It is impossible for Mukesh of flying a plane. He wants to be a motor mechanic and he doesnot ever dream of flying of plane.

Q.23. What kinds of bangle are made in Firozabad? 

Ans : Firozabad is famous for its bangles. The town produces all the bangles for the woman of India. Bangles of all sizes and colours are made here. One may have sunny gold or paddy green. There is choice of royal blue pink or purple. Every colour out of the seven colour of the rainbow is avaiable here.

Prose

SL. No.ChaptersLinks
Chapter 1The Last LessonClick Here
Chapter 2 Lost Spring Click Here
Chapter 3Deep WaterClick Here
Chapter 4 IndigoClick Here
Chapter 5Going PlacesClick Here

Poetry

SL. No.ChaptersLinks
Chapter 1A Thing Of BeautyClick Here
Chapter 2Keeping QuitClick Here
Chapter 3My Mother at Sixty-SixClick Here
Chapter 4 A Roadside StandClick Here

VISTAS

SL. No.ChaptersLinks
Chapter 1The Tiger KingClick Here
Chapter 2Magh Bihu or Maghar DomahiClick Here
Chapter 3Memory Of ChildhoodClick Here
Chapter 4 Journey to End Of the EarthClick Here
Chapter 5On The face of itClick Here
Chapter 6The EnemyClick Here

Q.24. Why does Mukesh’s grandmother believe that a god-given lineage’ can never be broken?

Ans : Mukesh’s grandmother had herself seen her husband go  with the dust from polishing the glass bangles. But, the grandmother says that it was just his ‘Karma’ or fate to suffer. They were born into the caste of bangle makers and they should never break the ‘God given lineage.’ They should think of no livelihood beyond bangle making. 

Q.25. Why do the children in Firozabad often lose their eyesigt even before they become adults?

Ans : Workers in the glass bangle industry have to work in sub human conditions. They have to face many health hazards. They go blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles. So They work in dark hutments. Moreover the of temparature around the farnacess remains unbearable high. So, the children in Firozabad often lose thier eyesight even before they become adults.

Long Questions & Answers (Marks : 5)

Q.1. Describe the Seemapuri?

Ans : Firozabad is famous for its bangles. Every other family in Firozabad is engaged in making bangles. It is the centre of the glass blowing industry. Families have to spend

generation making bangles for all the woman in Firozabad. Workers in the glass bangles industry have to work in subhuman conditions. They have to face many health hazards. They go blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles. They work in dark hutments. Moreover the temperature around the farnacess remains unbearable high. So, the children in Firozabad often lose their eyesight even before they become adults.

    The town produces all the bangles for the woman. Bangle of all sizes and colours are made here. One may have sunny gold or paddy green. There is a choice between royal blue, pink, or purple. Every colour out of the seven cololurs the rainbow is avaiable here. of

Q.2. Explain the phrase, “Seemapuri a place on the periphery of Delhi yet miles from it metaforically?

Ans : Seemapuri is the settlement of over 10000/ ragpickers who migrated here from Bangladesh in 1972. It is on the periphery of Delhi yet it is miles away from it metaforically. Workers in the glass bangles industry have to work in sub-human conditions. They have to face many health troubles. They go blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles. They work in dark hutments. Moreover the temperature around the farnaces remains unbearable high. So, children lose their eyesight even before they become adults.

      There is no sewage drainage or running water. It is difficult to believe that such a little hell can exists so near the capital of India.

Q.3. Why have the people of Firozabad lost their initiative and ability to dream?

Ans : The question is relates to the chapter ‘Lost Spring’ in which the writer describes the grinding poverty of the poor Indian children who lose their happiness for the sake of supporting their family.

     The town of Firozabad is famous for its glass bangles. But the families of the bangle-makers are caught in a perpetual state of poverty. The cry of not havng money to do anything except carry on the business of making bangles not even having enough to eat in ever home. Little has moved with time in Firozabad. Years of mind-numbing labour had made  the people of Firozabad lose their initiative, end their ability to dream. 

    They cannot organise themselves into co-operatives. If they do they will be hauled up by the police, beaten and dragged to jail for doing something illegal. There is no leader among them. No one could help them to see things differently. Thus the bangle makers are forced to move endlessly in the circle from poverty to apathy to greed and to injustice.

Q.4. What hinders the young men from organizing themselves into a co-operative?

Ans : The question relates to the chapter ‘Lost Spring’ in which the writer describes the grinding poverty of the poor Indian children who lose their happiness for the sake of supporting their poor family.

    The town of Firozabad is famous for its glass bangles. But the families of the bangle-makers are caught in a perpetual state of poverty. The cry of not having money to do anything except carry on the business of making langles, not even having enough to eat in every home. Little has moved with time in Firozabad. Years of mindnumbing labour had made the people of Firozabad lose their initiative and their alility to dream.

   They cannot organise themselves into co-operatives. If they do they will be hauled up by the police, beaten and dragged to jail for doing something illegal. There is no leader among them. No one could help them to see things differently. Thus the bangle makers are forced to more endlessy in the circle from poverty to apathy to greed and to injustice.

Q.5. ‘Food is more important for servival than an identity for the ragpickers’ says the author, Anees Junge Elucidate.

Ans : Anees Jung has rightly thinks that ‘food is important for servival than an identity for the ragpickers. More than 10000 (ten thousand) ragpickers in Seemapuri have lived there for more than thirty years without an identity. They have to beautiful land in search of food. They didnot need any identity wherever they find food, they pitch their tents. And servival in Seemapuri means ragpicking.

     Seemapuri may be on the Periphery of Delhi, yet miles away from it metaphorically. It is a little hell. Ragpickers lived in structures of mud. They have roofs of tin and tarpaulin. There is no sewage drainage or running water. It is unimaginable that it is a part of Delhi, the capital of India. 

Q.6. Show how for children like Saheb owning. Even shoes with a hole is a dream come true.

Ans : The narrator asked Saheb why he doesnot wear ‘chappals’. He simply answers that it is not lack of money, his mother did not buy them. There is a tradition to stay barefoot, in villages and slums. This explanation doesnot hold good. It seems merely an excuse to explain away a perpetual state of proverty.

     Saheb, a poor ragpickers of Seemapuri, remained shoeless. Most of such children remains shoeless. His parents could not afford to buy shoes for him. Saheb got discarded tennis. shoes of some rich boy. The rich boy refused to wear them  because of a hole in one of them. For Saheb even sipes, with a hole in a dream come true.

Q.7. ‘Little has moved with time in Firozabad’ Says Anees Jung. What makes her comment thus? 

Ans : The narrator is making a statement of facts. Actually ‘little has moved with the time in Firozabad.’ The old bangle making industry goes on as usual. So goes on the exploitation of bangle makers with it. “Workers in the glass-bangles industry hare to work in condition. They have to face many health trouben blind with the dust from polishing the glass or ongles. They work in dark hutments. More over the temperatr. around the furnaces remains unbearable high. So, children.. even lose their eyesight before they become adults. More than 20,000 young children work illegally in glass furnaces with high temperature. The exploitation of the money landers, the midlemen and the policemen continue unabated.

Long Questions & Answers (Marks : 7)

Q.1. Describe the miserable plight of the people of Firozabad?

Ans: Firozabad is basically a bangle town. Every other family in Firozabad is engaged in bangle making. Over 20,000 children work illegally in glass furnaces. Bangle making is their ‘God given lineage.’ They don’t dare to change it. Actually they know nothing except making bangles. Nobody cares for the law in Firozabad. Employment of children in glass and bangles industry continues unabated.

The fate on the children who work in glass furnaces is particularly pathetic. They have to work in exceptionally high temperatures. They work places and working culture are simply killing. They work in dingy dark rooms without windows. There is no provision of fresh air and light. Actually their eyes are adjusted more to the dark than with the light outside. The result is distrons. Many of them end up losing their eyesight– before they become adults. Little do they know about the sancity of bangles they made. Mind rumbing toil kills all dreams and hopes of child workers in Firozabad.

Q.2. Who is Saheb and what is ironical about his name? Describe Saheb’s life and life of the bare-foot army of ragpickers in Seemapuri?

Ans : Saheb is one of the army of barefoot ragpickers of seemapuri. His full name is “Saheb-e-Alam.” It means ‘lord of the universe.’ He doesnot know what it means. The irony is that this lord of the universe moves around barefoot scrounging for gold in garbage dumps.

      Saheb and the army of ragpickers lead quite a miserable life. They lived in Seemapuri among most unly gienic and unhealthy surroundings. They live in the structures. of mud with roofs of tin and tarpaulin. There is no sewage, no drainage and no running water in their settlement. They move around picking up rags without shoes. Seemapuri is on the periphery of Delhi, yet miles away from it metaphorically. For children garbage is wrapped in ‘wonder’. They may find a rupee, a ten rupee note or even a silver coin. They never stop scrounging. There is always hope of finding more. It is a means of servival for the elderly people.

Q.3. Describe the bangle makers of Firozabad? How does the vicious circle of the sahukars and the midlernen never allow them to come out of their preverty? 

Ans : Firozabad is famous for its bangles. Every other family in the town is engaged in this profession. It is the been welding glass and making bangles for all the women centre of the Indians glass blowing industry. They have in India. Over 20,000 children work illegally in the glass furnaces with high temperatures. They are exposed to all health hazards. These factories are stinking lanes chocked with garbage. They work in dingy rooms with no windows and outlets for fresh air. Their eyes are more adjusted to the dark than to the light outside. That is why many of theme end up losing their eyesight before they become adults.

        Firozabad refuses to moves with the time. Bangles workers have fallen in a web of proverty. Mind numbing toil has killed all their dreams of hopes. They can’t organize themselves into a cooperative. They have fallen into a vicious circle of ‘Sahukars.’ midlemen and the police. It seems the bangle workers of Firozabad are condemned to proverty and perpetual exploitation.

Q.4. What are the two different worlds that Anees Jung sees in Firozabad?

Ans : The question relates to the chapter ‘Lost Spring’ where the witer describes the grinding poverty of the poor Indian children who lose their hapiness just for the sake of supporting their poor family.

     The narrator Anees Jung notices that there are two distinct world in Firozabad. The first one is of the families of the bangle-makers caught in a perpetual state of poverty. They have just enough money to inresst in bangle

They not making business. They donot hence enough to eat. cannot send their children to school or build a proper house to live. In every family there is the cry of having money to do anything except carry on the business of making bangles.

       Morover there is also a vicious circle of the ‘Sahukars,’ the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of law, the bureaucrats and the politicians. They ensure that the exploitation of bangle makers continued unabated because they never organise themselves into a cooperative.

Q.5. How is Mukesh different from the other caildren of Firozabad? Why is the author cheered when she looks into his eyes?

Ans : Mukesh belongs to a family of bangle makers in Firozabad. But he has different dreams. He doesnot want to be a bangle-maker. He has other hopes and aspirations. His family has been in this business for a long time. They live in most pethetic surrounding. They work in dingy dark rooms without any windows of fresh air. They are exposed to all health hazards. Mind numbing toil has killed all their dreams and hopes. But Mukesh is an exception. He is a dreamer. He dares to challenge the ‘God given leanage’ of his family. He dreams of becoming a motor-mechanic.

     The author feels cheered up. She sees a spark of hopes and determination in Mukesh’s eyes. It is not just an empty dreams. Mukesh seems to be determined. He is prepared to go to a garage and learn his work. He is quite practical and realistic. He doesnot dream of flying a plane. He is contents to dream only of cars that he sees moving down the roads of his town.

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