HS First Year English ( Snapshots) Chapter-3 Ranga’s Marriage

HS First Year English ( Snapshots) Chapter-3 Ranga’s Marriage. Important questions for HS First Year English Questions Answers brings you latest queries and solutions with accordance to the most recent pointers NCERT. Students will clear all their doubts with regard to every chapter by active these necessary chapter queries and elaborate explanations that area unit provided by our specialists so as to assist you higher. These queries can facilitate students prepare well for the exams thanks to time constraint. HS First Year English ( Snapshots) Chapter-3 Ranga’s Marriage

HS First Year English ( Snapshots) Chapter-3 Ranga’s Marriage

Text Book Exercises

Short Answer type questions

Q.1. Describe the village of the narrator.

Ans. The narrator belongs to Hosahalli, a village in the Mysore state. The village has some mango trees, creepers and a pond. The people are very simple and most of them speak kannada. Very few people could know English. In Hosahalli, the sweet karigadabu’ is to a festive meal in south India.

Q.2. Describe the homecoming of Ranga, why was it ‘a great event’ in the village.

Ans. In Hosahalli didn’t have many people who knew English. Ranga’s father was the first man who had enough courage to send his son to Bangalore to study. He was coming back to the village. Naturally, his homecoming was a great event for the villagers. People rushed to have a look at Ranga. They were satisfied to see him that he was the same Ranga as he had been six months ago.

Q.3. How did the people realise that Ranga was the same man as he had been six months ago? Give one example to prove your point.

Ans. The people of Hosahalli were curious to see Ranga. Ranga had gone to Bangalore to study English. They rushed to have a look at him. Soon they were satisfied that Ranga was the same as he had been six months ago. A woman declared that Ranga hadn’t lost his caste.

Q.4. What did Ranga think about marriage?

Or, 

What is Ranga’s views on marriage?

Ans. The narrator asked Ranga if he wanted to get married. Ranga replied that he was not going to get married in near future. He needed to find the right girl. A man must marry a girl he admires. He would marry a mature girl of his own choice.

Q.5. Describe Rama Rao’s niece Ratna.

Ans. Rama Rao’s niece was a pretty girl of eleven. She had come to stay with her uncle. She was from a big town. She knew how to play the veena and the harmonium. She also had a sweet voice. Her parents had died. She could be the most suitable bride for Ranga.

Q.6. When and how did Ranga have the first sight of Ratna?

Ans. The narrator had made up his mind that he would get Ranga married. Ratna was the most suitable bride for him. Oneday Ratna was wearing a grand saree and came to the narrator’s house. He requested her to sing a song. He sent for Ranga while she was singing. He stopped at the threshold not to disturb her singing. He was curious to see the singer and so he peeped in.

Q.7. How did Ranga feel when he heard and saw Ratna for the first time?

Ans. Ranga peeped in to see the singer. Ratna stopped abruptly when she saw a stranger. Ranga was embarrassed. Ratna ran inside overcome by shyness. He asked the narrator about the girl and if she was married or not. His face shrivelled because the narrator told him a lie that the girl was married a year ago.

Q.8. What is Karigadabu?

Ans. Karigadabu is a fried South Indian sweet filled with coconut. 

Q.9. Why did the narrator ask Ranga to accompany him to see Shastri?

Ans. The narrator had made up his mind to get Ranga married to Ratna. He asked Ranga to accompany him to see Shastri. They would find out if ‘guru’ and ‘shani’ were favourable to him or not Shastri was already tutored by the narrator.

Q.10. Why was Ranga’s face shrivelled and finally, why was he praised and happy?

Ans. Ranga had developed a liking for Ratna in his heart. The narrator told him a lie that the girl got married a year ago, then Ranga’s face shrivelled.

However, when the narrator gave the news that the girl was still unmarried, Ranga was surprised and happy.

Q.11. ‘There’s greater truth in the Shastri than we. What does this statement tell about his mind?

Ans. Ranga could never realise that what Shastri told them about his marriage was just stage -managed acting. Shastri was tutored to do and say as the narrator told him. But Ranga was totally impressed by Shastri’s prediction. They suitad him. So he declared that astrology was a science. The Shastri contained greater truth than people imagined. 

Q.12. Why was the narrator invited by Rangappa?

Ans. The narrator was instrumental in arranging the marriage of Ranga and Ratna, Ranga invited the narrator on the birthday of his son Shyama. He wanted to pay respect to the narrator. 

Q.13. How did Rangappa honour the narrator and why?

Ans. Ranga knew that his marriage with Ratna was arranged due to the efforts of the narrator. He did not forget to invite him on the birthday of his son. He honoured the narrator when he named his ‘golden child’ Shyama after the name of the narrator. 

Q.14. Justify the title of the story.

Ans. The first few paragraphs of the story deal with the village Hosahalli, its people and Ranga’s going to Bangalore to study English. Major part of the story deals with Ranga’s marriage. The narrator finds in Ratna a suitable bride for Ranga. He confides in Rama Rao’s wife about if. He arranged their meeting at his own house. Ranga wanted to know about the girl. It shows his willingness to marry her. The marriage of Ranga and Ratna took place by the effort of the narrator. A son, Shyama was born to them. The narrator blesses the young child. Thus we can say the title of the story is quite appropriate as it revolves around the theme of Ranga’s marriage.

Text book Exercises

Q.1. Comment on the influence of English-the language and the way of life on Indian life as reflected in the story. What is the narrator’s attitude to English? 

Ans. The story ‘Ranga’s Marriage’ takes us to those times when there were few people in villages in India who knew English. The village accountant was the first one who had enough courage to send his son Ranga to Bangalore to study. Those days people didn’t speak in English in the village. They did not bring English words while talking in kannada. For example, Rama Rao’s son bought a bundle of firewood. The boy told her that he did not have any ‘Change’. The poor woman did not understand the English word ‘change’ and went away.

However, English was considered to be a priceless commodity’. So Ranga’s homecoming in the village was a great event. The people wanted to look him who had gone to Bangalore to study English. The villagers thought that one who received education in English lost their caste. Ranga had not lost his caste and culture.

The attitude of the narrator to English is quite positive. He considers English to be a ‘priceless commodity’. Ranga wears the sacred thread and bends low for ‘namaskara’ to his elders. 

Q.2. Astrologer’ perception are based more on hearsay and conjecture than what they learn from the study of the stars. Comment with reference to the story.

Or, 

Describe the role of Shastri in Ranga’s marriage.

Ans. People of the Mosahalli village suffer from many superstitions. One of the popular superstitions is the perception of astrologers towards astrology. It is true that astrologers don’t base their perceptions on the study of stars. They do not care much for the movement of the planets and their effect on man’s life. They are like the Shastri of the story. All their predictions are based on hearsay and conjecture. They are not based on scientific study of stars.

The attitude of Shastri in the story is self-explanatory. He is like a parrot. He utters what the narrator tutored him. Sometimes astrologers are tutored by their clients. They move their lips and count on their fingers just to impress unsuspecting persons. Shastri exactly does so to impress Ranga. The poor fellow doesn’t know that Shastri has repeated what he has been tutored. He knows that the astrologer says is ‘absolutely true.“

Q.3. Indian society has moved a long way from the way the marriage is arranged in the story. Discuss. 

Ans. Ranga’s marriage was performed at a time when old values and custom still dominated our social scene. The twenty first century is not the age of arranged marriages. In the modern world of science and technology. boys and girls don’t need a helper. They meet frequently. They try to understand each other. They judge all pros and cons. Then they resolve to become life partner. Their parents simply give their comment. If they oppose. the marriage is solemnised in the court. Even in the villages things are now different. Certainly the Indian society has moved a long way from the way the marriage is arranged in the story just like Ranga and Ratna. It was the narrator who thought that Ranga would be a good husband for Rama Rao’s niece Ratna. She is a pretty girl of eleven. At that time the marriage of Ranga & Ratna was possible in Hosahalli village but today it is unimaginable. Child marriage is legally prohibited and banned.

Q.4. What kind of a person do you think the narrator is?

Ans. The narrator appears to be a gentleman. He enjoys helping others and takes pain to make people happy around him. He is a villager of Hosahalli. The narrator is a good judge of men and matters. He is quick to judge that Ranga can be the best boy for Rama Rao’s niece Ratna. Time proves his choice.

The narrator is a realist. Ranga’s homecoming is a great event in the village. It may appear to be a little exaggerated today but not at that Ranga’s time. The narrator seems to have developed the English language. He calls English language a priceless commodity.“

The narrator impresses us with his presence of mind. He knows that the marriage needs the blessings of a priest and astrologer. Shastri is tutored to facilitate the marriage of Ranga and Ratna. Naturally, he earns respect from Ranga and Ratna. The couple names their child Shyama as a mark of respect for him. As a whole, he is a kind hearted person.

HORNBILL PROSE & POETRY

Sl. No.LessonLink
1The Portrait of a LadyClick here
2A PhotographClick here
3“We’re Not Afraid to Die…
If We Can All Be Together”
Click here
4Discovering Tut: The Saga ContinuesClick here
5The Laburnum TopClick here
6Landscape of the soulClick here
7The Voice of the RainClick here
8The Ailing planet:
The Green Movement’s Role
Click here
9The Browning VersionClick here
10ChildhoodClick here
11The AdventureClick here
12Silk RoadClick here
13My Impressions of AssamClick here
14Father to SonClick here

SNAPSHOTS

Sl. No.LessonLink
1The Summer of the Beautiful White HorseClick here
2The AddressClick here
3Ranga’s MarriageClick here
4Albert Einstein at SchoolClick here
5Mother’s DayClick here
6The Ghat of the Only WorldClick here
7BirthClick here
8The Tale of Melon CityClick here

Summary of the story

1. The narrator, Shyama of the story, belongs to Hosahalli village in Mysore state in South India. He narrates a story that happened ten years ago. These days few people could speak and understand English and all of them spoke Kannada. Even words like ‘change’ were not very current among people. The village accountant was the first one who had enough courage to send his son Ranga to Bangalore for study.

2. Ranga’s homecoming was a great event in the village. People rushed to see him Attracted by the crowd, the narrator too went there. Ranga came out wish a smile. He still wore a ‘janewara’, the sacred thread over his chest. Women felt satisfied that he had not yet lost his caste. Ranga did a ‘namaskara’ to the narrator respectfully. He bent low to touch his feet.

3. The narrator asked Rangappa when he planned to get married. Ranga replied that he had no plan of getting married in the near future. He believed in marrying only when one got physically and mentally matured. He would marry a girl who was mature. He didn’t believe in ‘arranged’ marriage. 

4. Ratna was Rama Rao’s niece. She was a pretty girl of eleven. She had come to stay with her uncle. She was from a big town and knew how to play the veena and the harmonium. She also had a sweet voice. The narrator thought that Ranga was just the boy for her. She was the most suitable bride for him.

5. The narrator was a frequent visitor to Rama Rao’s place. The girl was o quite free with him. It was a friday, she was wearing a grand saree. The narrator asked Ratna not to sit in the room and sing a song. He sent for Ranga Ranga stopped at the threshold. He didn’t want the singing to stop but was curious to see the singer. He peeped in. She abruptly stopped when she saw a stranger. She stood at a distance with her head lowered. Ranga repeatedly glanced at her and Ratna ran inside overcome by shyness. Ranga asks the narrator if she was married. The narrator told a lie that she was married a year ago. Ranga’s face shrivelled. He left for a while.

6. The process of choosing a girl was going on. The narrator asked Ranga to accompany him to see shastri. They would find out if ‘guru’ and *shani’ were favourable for him or not. Ranga accompanied him without any protest. The narrator asked Shastri to tell them what was worrying Ranga. He should put his science of astrology to test. Shastri did some calculations and then spoke in a serious tone that a girl was worrying him. She probably had the name of something found in the ocean. It could be Kamala or Ratna.

7. Everything went according to the plan of the narrator. Shastri was well tutored. The narrator told Ranga that actually the girl was not married. Then he asked Ranga if he had Ratna in his mind, Ranga admitted.

8. Time flew on wings Rangappa and Ratna got married. One day Ranga came to invite the narrator for dinner. It was the birthday of Ranga’s son Shyama. He was at three. The narrator went there for dinner. Ranga’s son Shyama rushed to him. He put his arms around his legs. The narrator kissed him on his cheek. He placed a ring on his tiny little finger.

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